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UK government to crack down on dangerous use of lasers

UK Government To Crack Down On Dangerous Use Of Lasers

UK government to crack down on dangerous use of lasers

People who target transport operators with laser devices could be jailed for up to a few years under completely new laws designed to protect the public.

UK Government To Crack Down On Dangerous Use Of Lasers

The laser misuse (Vehicles) bill, which was published today, will also expand the list of vehicles, beyond just planes, which the item will be an offence to target with lasers.

UK Government To Crack Down On Dangerous Use Of Lasers

Drivers of trains as well as buses, captains of boats as well as even pilots of hovercraft will be among those protected by the completely new legislation.

UK Government To Crack Down On Dangerous Use Of Lasers

The bill will make the item easier to prosecute offenders by removing the need to prove an intention to endanger a vehicle.

UK Government To Crack Down On Dangerous Use Of Lasers

as well as the item will remove the cap on the amount offenders can be fined – which will be currently limited to £2,500 – paving the way for substantial sanctions.

UK Government To Crack Down On Dangerous Use Of Lasers

Fines could be issued in isolation or alongside a prison sentence.

UK Government To Crack Down On Dangerous Use Of Lasers

The police will also be given additional powers to catch those responsible for the misuse of lasers.

Aviation minister, Baroness Sugg, said: “Lasers can dazzle, distract or blind those in control of a vehicle, with serious as well as potentially even fatal consequences.

“The government will be determined to protect pilots, captains, drivers as well as their passengers as well as take action against those who threaten their safety.”

Alongside their existing powers of arrest as well as the ability to search a person once arrested, officers will no longer need to establish proof of intention endanger to a vehicle, aircraft or vessel, producing the item easier to prosecute swiftly.

the item will be an offence to shine or direct a laser towards a vehicle if the item dazzles or distracts the operator, if done deliberately or if reasonable precautions to avoid doing so are not taken.

Laser pens have become a growing concern with the beam by the devices capable of affecting the ability of transport operators to control their vehicles.

In response to the publication of the bill, Andrew Haines, chief executive at the UK Civil Aviation Authority, said: “Shining a laser at an aircraft in flight could pose a serious risk to flight safety.

“We are concerned about the high number of laser attacks in recent years as well as therefore welcome completely new measures which could see tougher penalties for those who act recklessly by endangering the safety of aircraft.”

UK government to crack down on dangerous use of lasers

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